5 Benefits of having a Hobby

I used to dread the question in conversation, “so, what do you do for fun?”

Um. What do I do for fun? Let’s see… Uh. I would reflect to the prior week and go through my daily run of schedule. Did I even do anything fun? The better question, did I do anything fun that I wanted to share about in conversation?

*One minute later*

“Umm.. I like to work out but you know school takes up a lot of time so I’m usually pretty busy with that”

While school does take up a lot of my time, it realistically doesn’t take up the 168 hours I have in a week.

One day, I came to the conclusion that: I need a hobby!!

So, what are the benefits to having a hobby?

  1. Hobbies have no deadlines and are pressure-free. The time you set out to do your hobby is simply meant for you to get in touch with your creative side, that’s it.
  2. They can be a break from your daily routine- Sometimes you just need to do something that doesn’t involve work.
  3. They make you feel productive. Most hobbies involve creating something and at the end of the day it feels satisfying to know that you worked on a project that has a physical result.
  4. You can talk about it in conversation & won’t have to dread the “what do you do for fun” question- not only that, but you may find that you have more similar interests with the someone than you had originally thought
  5. It’s an opportunity to learn more about yourself. “What about this hobby is satisfying to me?” “What inspires my creativity?” Answering these questions can change your life outside of your hobby.

Remember- You don’t have to be good at something for it to be your hobby. You just have to enjoy it, and that’s the beautiful part about having a hobby!

 

 

The Greatest Self-Reflection Mistake you’re Making

Trying to live your “best life”?

Many experts say that one of the keys to living up to your potential is to be self-aware. With out true self-awareness, it is difficult to grow as an individual. What does that mean? Let’s say you’re in a math class and no matter how hard you try you keep failing every assignment. It’s just not clicking. So, you decide to take a step back and reflect. You start to list the reasons why you’re doing so poorly: “I don’t try that hard, I suck at math, I’ve never been good at it, I’m just more of a science person.” After this pitty-party, you think to yourself “I just self-reflected.. Why isn’t this self-reflecting thing working? Why am I not getting better?”

Do you see a pattern in these self-reflections? They all ask the questions “why” A-Ha! What if instead of asking “why” you rephrased your questions to start out with “what“. So, instead of “Why am I bad?” you can ask “What am I not understanding?” or “What can I do differently on the next assignment?”

“What” questions give you a chance to answer more constructively. Instead of dwelling on your wrongs, they can force you to think logically versus emotionally. They can give you a growth perspective because they focus on what you can do in the future versus what you have done wrong in the past/ what you think is wrong with your character.

Here are some more rephrased self-reflection examples:

Instead of “why am I broke?” you can ask “what habits do I need to change to be more financially sound?”

Instead of “why are things not working with my significant other?” you can ask “what is not working well for us?”

These questions will help you achieve more self-awareness by removing emotional attachments.

“Self awareness is the ability to take an honest look at your life without any attachment to it being right or wrong, good or bad.”

 

FYI-This way of self reflecting did not come from me and I do not take credit for the idea. It is my own interpretation of a a piece of work with my own examples. The ideas in this post were taken from and inspired by a Ted Talk called:

“Increase your self-awareness with one simple fix- Tasha Eurich”

Check it out. Click the Link Here.

3 Things You Need to Ask Yourself Before Starting A Fitness Journey

I posted this quote on my Finding Motivation a Tuesday post, but it is too relevant not to say (or write) again:

“Change the approach but never the goal”

How many new year’s resolutions have you written that are almost identical to the ones you wrote the year before?

How many times have you said “I’ll start when ___” or my personal favorite “diet starts tomorrow”?

I have done and said every single one of these.

This post is not to say that I am the expert on fitness, but it is to point out the three questions that need to be answered before you decide how you will approach your fitness goals. Once you take these three questions into consideration – it will make sustaining your new healthy habits that much easier.

Let’s get started:

  1. The first question: “Do I know myself?”

It’s a deep one. I know. Why do I say this? Let me give an example. I like to go to a lot of social events. So, what makes a social gathering an event? Food. And it’s usually not the healthiest.  Knowing this, I used to tell myself that I would eat before I got to an event so that when I got there I wouldn’t eat. That never happened. What ended up happening was I would eat before an event and would still eat when I got there. Every time. It made me realize- for me, eating is a very social activity. If I don’t eat at an event, I feel like I’m insulting the host and am not fully partaking in the experience of the event. Realizing this about myself now, I wait until I arrive at an event to eat. As small of a change as this sounds, it has made a huge difference.

Another example- I have tried several different “diets”- paleo, vegan, gluten-free, eliminating processed foods.. the list goes on. These lifestyles may work perfectly for others! I am not discouraging these ways of eating. I wish I was able to sustain them. However, knowing myself, I know that I will I follow these diets rigidly for a few weeks or months, only to binge on everything I was restricting myself from shortly afterwards.

What I am trying to say is what works for others may not work for you. Know yourself. What can you realistically commit to? Do research and decide whether you’ll feel fulfilled or not with certain eating or exercise habits in the long run. There are healthy habits that are tailored to your lifestyle. Find meaning and purpose in your daily routines, and do it in a way where you feel healthy and most importantly HAPPY!

     2. The second question: “What are my priorities?”

Make a list. Rank them.

Example: 1- School, 2- Working out, 3- Hanging out with friends, etc.

Ranking your priorities helps you organize your day. So, if this was my priorities list, I would make sure I got all of my school work done and then the next on my list would be working out. Only if I got all of these done would I hang out with friends. Visualizing what your priorities are everyday will make a difference in keeping track of your daily habits. If it helps, put your priorities list somewhere that you will see them often. This way you will be constantly reminded of what they are.

3. The third question: “Am I actually committed to this?”

Or is this another “diet starts tomorrow” kind of fitness plan?

Find real meaning that will keep you committed to your plan. If your motivation to get in-shape is based on a temporary feeling, then your drive will also be temporary. What is the real reason you want to get in shape?

Write your purpose. Print pictures. Make plans.

You can do this!