If You’re Bad at Remembering History, Read This.

You can teach me about the same war twenty times and a day later I will have already forgotten about it.

Does this sound like you?

Yesterday I was at the airport waiting to board when a woman across from me asked: “so where are you traveling to?” Quite honestly I wasn’t in the mood to chat. I had an early flight that morning and this was my connecting one. Regardless, I told her and we began to chat about our travels. She was around her mid 40s – early 50s. Her shortish golden hair reminded me of my grandmother’s.

After around ten minutes, the plane began to board. Turns out, I was sitting behind her. We talked about how she met her husband on a beach in Spain years ago. She described how they are still madly in love even after having three kids. Although that is nowhere near where my life is at right now, I felt as though we were very similar.

When we got off of the plane, we were going through airport security and she began to tell me about some Dutch history. Before she went any further, I had to tell her: “I’m going to be honest I love history. I think it’s fascinating.. but I never remember it. I’ve seen several castles and battle grounds in Ireland and I couldn’t tell you one fact about them.” She laughed at me. I felt a bit embarrassed. Then she said this:

“I’m bad at remembering history too!”

“Really, so how do you know all of these facts?”

“I read children’s books”

“Do they actually help?”

” Yes, because it’s more important to understand the big picture before trying to remember the small details. I read a children’s book called the history of France before I went there. My friend and I brought the book with us and matched the illustrated pictures to the things we saw while we were there.”

“Where have you been my whole life! Haha”

“Also there’s a lot of movies that can help with that too.”

Our conversation went further, but I had never thought of doing this. Children’s books have to explain things in simple terms. Only once you get something in simple terms can you dive deeper and learn more.

This advice has really and truly changed my life. Time to go buy some children’s books.

Have you tried this before?

XO,

YOUNGCOCO

What’s the Greatest Thing You Can Do for Others?

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What’s the greatest thing you can do for others?

Become genuinely happy.

Here’s the secret though: becoming genuinely happy takes work. Are you willing to do it?

What habits are preventing you from becoming genuinely happy?

Here are some common habits I am familiar with and have noticed affect others’ happiness as well:

1. Being a pushover

2. Making decisions that don’t align with your goals

3. Not being true to yourself

4. Doing things only for instant gratification

5. Being selfish

Why do these habits affect us negatively? They prevent us from having genuine connections with ourselves which in turn makes it hard for us to connect with others. 

Think of a time when you truly felt good about yourself. Not just in a superficial way, but in a way that went deeper. You were excited to wake up and felt like you were in great alignment. Your conversations were not only great internally, but this alignment allowed for you to have great interactions with others. Every action and moment felt like it served a greater purpose. You felt connected to source. 

So, if you aren’t new to my blog, you know that I love to ask questions. I think asking yourself questions often is so important in understanding ourselves and why we behave in certain ways.

Here are some questions I want you to consider in figuring out how you will become genuinely happy:

How will I spend my mornings?

For me, mornings are sacred. I need time to wake up. If I don’t get this time, it affects my day and mood. The days I’m happiest are when I wake up and meditate. Don’t check my phone. Take time to pick out my outfit and plan my day. 

What will I do everyday to work toward my goals?

No matter who you are, working toward a goal is crucial in finding meaning in your everyday life. My goal is to lead a healthy lifestyle. I walk every single day. Walks are a good way for me to reflect and get in fresh air while getting steps in. I enjoy them too! What thing can you implement that will work with your schedule? Pick something you will enjoy doing and stick with it. Make it essential in your daily routine.

 What is/ will be my creative outlet?

We all need one. Is it music? Writing? Painting? Whatever it is, make sure you have a bit of it at least once a week. Do something simply for the fun of it. 

What will I do to stop myself from going back to old habits that prevent my happiness?

Figure out your triggers and check-in with yourself often. Why are you doing what you’re doing? I used to go out when I was sad or disappointed- not because I wanted to celebrate or have fun. In an attempt to escape reality, this habit only made me sadder. Now before I go out, I ask myself: why am I going out? And if it’s because I’m sad, I will decide to stay in and pamper myself. This has quick reflecting time has changed my life. Realize your own destructive behaviors, why you do them, and what you can do to change them for a healthier way of coping. 

What do you think? What makes you genuinely happy?

Thanks for reading!

XO,

YOUNGCOCO

Cork, Ireland

The Food

The Bosun Bar & Restaurant: We ordered fish and chips and seafood chowder, which came with soda bread (very popular in Ireland). While we were there, we asked for tartar sauce and they gave us a huge pot of it that was in the shape of a genie lantern. Bosun has the best fish and chips I’ve had so far. I usually try to avoid fish and chips because I’ve had some bad experiences. Not this time!

The Shack: A cute donut shop in Cork City. It’s in a small corner of one of the streets in the centre. We ordered a Boston creme, I ordered a hazelnut donut, and we also got a pistachio coffee flavored one. While there were several cute and fun colored donuts, we chose the most basic looking ones. The one I ate, had a mint-flavored filling which threw me off. I later found out it was because it had Aero mint chocolate in it.

Rocket Man: This is also cute place in Cork City. It’s a small shop and, in the front, they have benches and fake grass for customers to sit and eat. They sell a variety of sandwiches, soups, and sauces that you can take to go. They heat-up our meals before serving them to us. Seriously so yummy- the coffee was decent.

The Views


We decided to go on a carousel ride in the middle of the city and here was one of the views from the top. The ride attendants were hilarious. They spun us around every time we got to the bottom and kept asking us if we were American.

The view from our house. Ships are constantly passing through and there’s a nice walking path by the water.

The Transit

The first day I got into Cork, we brought my brother to school. We loaded our car onto the ferry and crossed the river then drove the rest of the way.

I wish public transit was as much of a thing in the States as it is in Europe. On Thursday, I took the bus into South Mall (the city) and I was so confused. The bus doesn’t announce or have any displays of what the next stop is. I assume it’s because most people are locals, but it’s still strange. On the way back home, we got off like six stops to early and ended up walking almost a mile because we were scared of missing our stop. Oops!

A Few Words for (almost) Every Place I’ve Traveled To (so far)

Seattle, Washington: genuine people, rain, street art.

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Las Vegas: another world, extreme heat, futuristic.

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Liverpool, England: good friends, english breakfast, live music.

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Huntington Beach, California: light blue, lively, outdoor malls.

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Ireland: green, cold water, cows.

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New England: family, Rhode Island, Massachusetts.

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New York: expensive, diverse, trains.

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Italy: brick roads, Julius Caesar, fountains.

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I recommend you try this exercise- write down every place you’ve been to and then write down the first few words that come to mind when you remember your experience in that place.