What’s Really Holding You Back?

“We suffer more in imagination than in reality”

Why do we let fear control our experiences when 99.9% of the things we worry about never end up happening?!

Can you imagine how different your life would be if your thoughts weren’t constantly  self-defeating?

While fear can be beneficial to us in some cases, like keeping us away from dangerous situations, it can also be damaging by preventing us from growing and living a peaceful life. Think about all of the opportunities you’ve missed by letting fear take over.

I think that the most inspiring people I’ve met seem to be fearless. They aren’t afraid to speak up, take risks, and can talk to virtually anybody confidently. How did they get to be this way?

Being curious, I listened to a podcast with a series of interviews about becoming fearless. One of interviewees, in the podcast, described how he got over one of his biggest fears- swimming. By the end of 3 months, he had not only learned how to swim, but ended up swimming two miles in the ocean. He describes how he felt in this moment: invincible. Not only did he conquer his fears, he mastered them. He explains how this experience led him to the realization that he had the capability to achieve much more than he had thought and that he had been letting fear limit his whole life.

At the end of the podcast, another interviewee revealed one of his strategies to overcoming his daily fears. He calls it fear-setting. His strategy has three parts:

Define, Prevent, Repair. 

He said that writing out your fears is key to putting them to rest. So, he has a journal where he divides his pages into define, prevent, and repair columns.

In the first column, he defines his fear. For example: “I won’t do well on my presentation next week”.

In the second, he writes what he can do to prevent this from happening like “I will practice 10 times this week”.

In the third column, he writes how he can repair the situation if the bad things happens anyways: “I will realize that I’m not perfect and there is room for growth”.

 

If you wan’t to learn more about the insights from this practice, look up Tim Ferriss. I believe he also has a Ted Talk that you can watch on the topic!

 

My Favorite Salad from Trader Joe’s

The title might be deceiving.. it’s not pre-made, but all of the ingredients can be found at Trader Joe’s. Lol.

Recipe Inspired by: A salad I had at a restaurant in California.. I loved it so much I had to make something similar.

Why it’s my favorite: This salad is light, flavorful, and looks boujee.

Ingredients:

  • arugula
  • pine nuts
  • prosciutto
  • seasoned mozzarella balls (at least that’s what I call them haha)
  • shredded carrot
  • grape tomato
  • Trader Joe’s Balsamic dressing

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I don’t have measurements, but honestly just put in most of what you like!

Could taste good paired with: wine, fries, or pasta

 

 

 

3 Things You Need to Ask Yourself Before Starting A Fitness Journey

I posted this quote on my Finding Motivation a Tuesday post, but it is too relevant not to say (or write) again:

“Change the approach but never the goal”

How many new year’s resolutions have you written that are almost identical to the ones you wrote the year before?

How many times have you said “I’ll start when ___” or my personal favorite “diet starts tomorrow”?

I have done and said every single one of these.

This post is not to say that I am the expert on fitness, but it is to point out the three questions that need to be answered before you decide how you will approach your fitness goals. Once you take these three questions into consideration – it will make sustaining your new healthy habits that much easier.

Let’s get started:

  1. The first question: “Do I know myself?”

It’s a deep one. I know. Why do I say this? Let me give an example. I like to go to a lot of social events. So, what makes a social gathering an event? Food. And it’s usually not the healthiest.  Knowing this, I used to tell myself that I would eat before I got to an event so that when I got there I wouldn’t eat. That never happened. What ended up happening was I would eat before an event and would still eat when I got there. Every time. It made me realize- for me, eating is a very social activity. If I don’t eat at an event, I feel like I’m insulting the host and am not fully partaking in the experience of the event. Realizing this about myself now, I wait until I arrive at an event to eat. As small of a change as this sounds, it has made a huge difference.

Another example- I have tried several different “diets”- paleo, vegan, gluten-free, eliminating processed foods.. the list goes on. These lifestyles may work perfectly for others! I am not discouraging these ways of eating. I wish I was able to sustain them. However, knowing myself, I know that I will I follow these diets rigidly for a few weeks or months, only to binge on everything I was restricting myself from shortly afterwards.

What I am trying to say is what works for others may not work for you. Know yourself. What can you realistically commit to? Do research and decide whether you’ll feel fulfilled or not with certain eating or exercise habits in the long run. There are healthy habits that are tailored to your lifestyle. Find meaning and purpose in your daily routines, and do it in a way where you feel healthy and most importantly HAPPY!

     2. The second question: “What are my priorities?”

Make a list. Rank them.

Example: 1- School, 2- Working out, 3- Hanging out with friends, etc.

Ranking your priorities helps you organize your day. So, if this was my priorities list, I would make sure I got all of my school work done and then the next on my list would be working out. Only if I got all of these done would I hang out with friends. Visualizing what your priorities are everyday will make a difference in keeping track of your daily habits. If it helps, put your priorities list somewhere that you will see them often. This way you will be constantly reminded of what they are.

3. The third question: “Am I actually committed to this?”

Or is this another “diet starts tomorrow” kind of fitness plan?

Find real meaning that will keep you committed to your plan. If your motivation to get in-shape is based on a temporary feeling, then your drive will also be temporary. What is the real reason you want to get in shape?

Write your purpose. Print pictures. Make plans.

You can do this!