3 Lessons from a Traditional French Home

ideas, Uncategorized

Disclaimer: I have never been to France, however, these are lessons I have taken from the book Home Sweet Maison: The French Art of making a Home

1. Have Dedicated Rooms:

As supposed to open floor plans in a modern American home, the traditional French home keeps each room a separate space. The reason for this being that every room is a dedicated space for a particular activity. The kitchen is for cooking, living room for entertaining and so on. The French believe that it is important to focus on one stimulus at a time. One should not cook while talking to friends but rather make them separate events. This type of separation in activities allows for us to be more present in the moment and truly experience each part.

2. Your Entry Way is Important:

Your entry is the room you enter as you walk into somebody’s home. In the states, it’s usually a place to take off your shoes or hang your coat. In a traditional french home, your entry way is much more than that. This is a place where you showcase your favorite art or photograph. It’s a place to showcase an event that has transformed your life. Only one’s favorite pieces or important experiences is shown at the front. It is a great talking point for people who come in as it says a lot about the person’s home in which you are about to enter.

3. Control and Mindfulness

Everything in moderation. The author of the book describes how her French husband came to New York with her, didn’t change what he ate, yet he had gained 15 pounds within the first year of moving. Turns out, we have much bigger portions than the French. Who knew? In their culture, it is frowned upon to eat without control. Food is eaten mindfully as is the consumption of alcohol.

Which of these ideas do you think could benefit you in your home?

Thanks for reading,

Coco

Kitchen Disasters: Crepes

Baking + Cooking, Uncategorized

Background Information: Crepes originated in a western part France. Henri Charpentier, a master chef from Monaco, played a big role in the growth in popularity of crepes. Today, February 2nd is France’s dedicated day to celebrate crepes also known as le jour des crêpes. Read more here.

The Recipe: I found the recipe for these crepes on allrecipes.com – It was the first one that came up on the search.

Issues/ Lessons:

  1. Make sure you have all the ingredients.. I didn’t have regular milk so I used soy milk (which is a replacement anyways but definitely changed the flavor of the recipe)
  2. The batter, when I measured out the ingredients according to the recipe, was very thick. Because I have made them before, I know this isn’t the consistency I wanted it to be- so I added another egg and poured in more soy milk without measuring it out until the bater looked to be a liquid consistency
  3. Look at other platings and topping ideas for inspiration. I’ve always loved banana and Nutella on my crepes, but it’s more fun to branch out and try something new. I also stacked the crepes and it made them too thick when I prefer them thin.

The Final Product:

My brother always says: “Coco, your food always tastes better than it looks.” He’s 100% right. Truthfully these crepes were just O.K. though they were a bit dry and too eggy. Because I am impatient when it comes to making food, I don’t think my dishes come out as good as they would if I didn’t skip steps.

Pinterest Inspiration:

Check out my Pinterest Board dedicated to crepes. There are so many good looking savory recipes which I will have to try next time.

Question:

As I am new to baking/ cooking I would like to ask: have any experienced cooks also experienced being impatient while cooking and how do you overcome it?